Many Things at Once

Excerpt from "Kerry James Evans: From Combat Engineer to Poet," by Dana JenningsThe New York Times: ArtBeat, October 22, 2013: 

Like a combat engineer, a poet is aware of many things at once: narrative, musicality, line length, image, rhythm, syntax, etc. A poet is always looking for a balance of literary elements to keep the poem alive. For example, three long sentences in a row will leave the reader out of breath. Too many polysyllabic words can cause a reader to trip over his or her tongue. However, when a poet finds the right balance with concern to formal technique, the poem’s meaning has a better chance of being understood.

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Barred

by Kerry James Evans, from Five Poems (Narrative Magazine)

 Gary, Indiana

I belly-crawled through rubble
and ash. Sidewalks
shattered against the curb,
and the asphalt
wintered itself like madness
leaving a wolf after the kill,
after the throat bleeds
out onto the ground.

I licked bullets from brick walls,
abandoned the car
at a steel mill. I dropped
from the sky like mortar fire,
like the youth
of this town—sponged
from a five-gallon bucket
and the liquor stores still open.


Kerry James Evans reads his poetry at the Florida State University Warehouse Reading Series.

Evans, K. J. (2013). Bangalore. [Copper Canyon Press, library]